Working toward a quality education for all.


Developing A Generation of Young Employed Leaders

By Hassanatu and Hussainatu Blake, 

Though youth are better educated than their parents, youth remain almost twice as likely to be unemployed than their elders. On the African continent, young people aged between 15 and 25 represent more than 60% of the Africa’s total population and account for 45% of the total labor force (1). Some of the highest rates on the continent are in southern Africa, where 51% of young women and 43% of young men are unemployed (2). At least half of young people ages 15 to 19 lack basic literacy, transferrable skills or technical or vocational skills that match the needs of employers (3).

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Schools on the front line in the fight against sexual abuse in Haiti

by Trillium Hibbeln, 

Schools on the front line in the fight against sexual abuse in Haiti Gender-Based Violence (GBV) is a significant public health concern for all girls and women in Haiti and particularly in the urban center of Port-au-Prince. One in three women in Haiti have experienced sexual violence and half of all rape victims are under age 17 at the time of the crime (Amnesty International 2008) 

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Not Just The New Fashion

by Dr. Denise Raquel Dunning, 

 ‘Fashion week’ just ended for the global development community, when thousands of international leaders convened in New York for the UN General Assembly (UNGA). Presidents, ministers, donors, UN leaders, and CEOs celebrated the newest designs in global development: stylish poverty reduction plans, glamorous partnerships to prioritize girls’ education, and beautiful spokespeople for the latest hot issues like climate change and child trafficking.

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A Difficult Journey for Education: Village Life in Nepal

by Nabin Aryal, 

Every Spring, our foundation welcomes a new group of girls to become Rukmini Scholars. Our mentors, program officer, selection committee members and other volunteers visit villages surrounding the Pharping area (Pharping is roughly 20 KM South of Kathmandu, Nepal) to identify girls whose families may be facing hardships in trying to continue their schooling.

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Ending Child Slavery…All Together Now!

by Jill Christianson, 

On a sunny day late in September, I tagged along on a lobbying visit to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington – led by Kailash Satyarthi, with colleagues from the Child Labor Coalition and the International Labor Rights Forum.  Following this fall’s swirl of activities at the UN General Assembly and a myriad of meetings about the Beyond-2015 plans (Sustainable Development Goals) including education, Kailash is focused on one thing…ENDING CHILD SLAVERY.

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Investing in People, Not Projects

by Bradley Broder, 

A villager from rural Kenya once said to me that his community needs a rainwater catchment system that would feed water tanks to each house in his village.  When I pressed him as to why he feels this is so vital given that there is a clean water source less than a kilometer away, his response was unequivocal: “because the volunteer before you helped the village down the road to get water tanks.  We want them to!”

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Business, as Usual, Distorts Education

by Steve Klees, 

Capitalism became a global force centuries ago.  But for most of its history, there was a struggle through which the inequalities and excesses that came along with it were tempered, at least partially, by government interventions.  That led, in many countries, to about 50 years of the welfare state, from the 1930s to the 1970s, in which government was seen as playing a major and legitimate role in reigning in capitalism.  All that changed in the 1980s with the election of Thatcher in the U.K., Reagan in the U.S., and Kohl in Germany.  Since then, neoliberalism has dominated, within which government is maligned and seen as illegitimate, and business and the market reign supreme.  This has had enormous and harmful consequences for public policy, in general, and for education, in particular.  Business, embedded in a market system, has been the driving force for education throughout the past 30+ years of the neoliberal era around the world.   The global emphasis on business and the market system has distorted education in myriad ways, including:

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