Working toward a quality education for all.

The importance of details, and well-rooted ones, at that

by Jinny St. Goar, 

Our small organization is focused largely on one locality in southwestern Mali in the villages of Djangoula that are found within the commune of Benkadi Founiya just south of the regional administrative center, Kita. Roughly five kilometers from the dirt road that ends in the county seat of Founiya, these villages were simply too remote for their youngest children to benefit from the early years of education.

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Learning your Impact in Local and Global Communities

by Amanda Malamut , 

In the next couple of weeks, students from all over the United States are heading back into the school routine. While we know that the basics like math and English will be covered in classrooms, but we want to make sure that students are self-aware and realize that they can be agents of change. Students should learn that their actions, no matter how small, can make a significant impact in their local and global communities.

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Education for All: What’s advocacy got to do with it?

by Emily Teitsworth, 

Why are we failing to deliver on the promise of educating girls? In rural areas in Nigeria, surveys have found that at the end of 3rd grade, only 6 percent of students are able to read a simple sentence. In Malawi, it is illegal for pregnant girls and young mothers to return to school. In Guatemala, only 10 percent of rural girls complete secondary education.

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Expanding Educational Opportunities through Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

by Dr. Joanna Rubinstein, 

As development experts know, the pay-back of educating girls is extraordinary. But based on current trends, by 2015, only 56 percent of countries will have achieved gender parity in lower secondary education. And if trends continue at the current pace, the poorest girls in sub-Saharan Africa will not even achieve universal primary school completion until 2086 (UNESCO, 2014).

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Can’t Keep a Secret

It has been so hard to keep this quiet, but we don’t have to anymore! Our Fall 2014 Youth Advocacy Training application is live! The training, taking place October 17-21, 2014 gives U.S. based 18-25 year olds an opportunity to learn about Education for All and the ways they can be agents for change in their communities.

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What are you #StrongerThan?

I have always gotten a kick out of doing something that someone said I couldn’t do or that I am not supposed to do—finishing a grueling hike, building something, fixing something or even something as seemingly simple as getting up each and every day and going back to finish something you started even if everyone is against you. All of that takes strength—the strength to do, the strength to overcome and the strength to keep going.

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New UNICEF/UNESCO Reports Reveal Stalled Progress in Africa

by Mark Engman, 

Every year, June 16 is the Day of the African Child.  It commemorates the thousands of courageous children in Soweto, South Africa, who in 1976 marched to protest apartheid and to demand equal education. The march ended in violence: – hundreds of youth were wounded or killed.  Their legacy continues to build a better future for African children.

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Call Me, Maybe?

If you are anything like me, you hate the phone. I would much rather someone text me or email me—hey even tweeting me is better than a phone call. But sometimes a good old fashioned phone call is what is going to get the job done and on June 16, we are asking you to dust off the landlines or fire up the cell to place a call for an important cause—the millions of children around the world that are out of school.

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From Invisible to Visible: Being Able To “See” the Crisis in Learning

by Rukmini Banerji, 

The group of mothers sitting in the sun in a village in north India was happy to chat. We talked about children and about their school. “Are they going to school?” I asked. “Of course,” said the mothers proudly. Some went further to say, “we even send them for private coaching after school.” “How are they doing with their education?” The common word for education in Hindi is the same as reading-writing. The chatter stopped. One mother looked at me sternly and said, “How do we know? We are illiterate. Anyway, that is the business of the school and of the teachers.” 

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